A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
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- Preparatory research
- Writting
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...
A Matter of Autonomy For a society that lives mostly in cities interconnected by global systems, autonomy can seem an impossible desire. We are dependent on one another in terms of resources, skills, and knowledge. But this dependency does not absolve the individual of responsibility for themselves and their role within the larger society. By reframing the notion of autonomy itself, this project promotes the active and critical position of the autonomous individual, who has the freedom to explore and question the given structures around them. By acknowledging the impact of our individual choices on our environment, this project looks for new ways to re-engage with the strictly controlled urban setting. A mobile workshop located in public space becomes the site for the collection of material freely available in the city—street dust and debris—and for the transformation of this material into temporary objects. Potato starch is used as a binder to create simple objects for public space, such as planters and benches. These objects are not only functional but also challenge the perception of public space as something to be passively experienced, rather than inhabited and actively designed by users. The project works on three levels and timeframes. The creation moment attracts attention through the large-scale machinery and playful process, encouraging people to ask questions. The engagement of public space with the objects invites new activities and relationships with the city. Finally, the biodegrading process returns the material to the environment, leaving space for new interventions.
More about the research ...